Galapagos GNP NEWS: New Nest Found in Lonesome George’s Corral

21 July 2009

Puerto Ayora, Galapagos

Hopes Soar at the Prospect of Obtaining a Descendant for Lonesome George

Lonesome George looks on as Edgar Munoz, Director of the Galapagos National Park, measures one of the eggs from the nest of one of George’s female companions which was laid earlier this week.

Lonesome George looks on as Edgar Munoz, Director of the Galapagos National Park, measures one of the eggs from the nest of one of George’s female companions which was laid earlier this week.

This past Saturday, Female No. 107, one of the two female tortoises who shares a corral with Lonesome George—the last Pinta Island Tortoise in the world—and who laid a nest for the first time back in 2008, returned to nest again this year. In the conservation world and in Galapagos, hopes are high that the eggs from her nest will produce a descendent for Lonesome George—the emblematic reptile of the Galapagos Islands.

Yesterday afternoon, guards opened the nest and five eggs were found in perfect condition. These eggs were removed, weighed, measured, and placed in artificial incubators at the Giant Tortoise Center for Reproduction and Captive Breeding at the Galapagos National Park. Now we must wait 120 days for the incubation process to unfold before learning if the eggs are fertile.

Because of the need to try to bring back the Pinta tortoise species (Geochelone abingdoni) from the brink of extinction, the five eggs were placed in an incubator kept at a temperature of 29.5 ° C, which will allow for the growth of female tortoises instead of males.

Female No. 107 and her female companion No. 106 are from the species Geochelone becki, originally from Wolf Volcano on Isabela Island. They have a carapace that is shaped similar to the shell of Lonesome George. Since 1993, the three tortoises have shared a corral, with the hope that they might eventually reproduce together.

In July of 2008, both female tortoises laid nests for the first time. But, hopes were dashed when all of the eggs were declared infertile near the end of the year. This time around in 2009, scientists are hopeful, but not optimistic, that this latest nest will produce a descendant for Lonesome George and his near-extinct species of Pinta Giant Tortoises.

Proceso de Relaciones Públicas – Parque Nacional Galápagos – Ecuador
For more information, write to: comunicacion@spng.org.ec, or visit http://www.galapagospark.org

 

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About Rene

About Ecuador, Galápagos, the Hospitality & Tourism industry, Conservation and personal Tidbits from a Swiss Hôtelier working in Ecuador & Galapagos and committed to supporting and encouraging local youngsters in Education, Sports and Environmental protection via my Foundation "Nova Galápagos."
This entry was posted in Marinelife Wildlife Fauna and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Galapagos GNP NEWS: New Nest Found in Lonesome George’s Corral

  1. Bingbm says:

    I am not going to be original this time, so all I am going to say that your blog rocks, sad that I don’t have suck a writing skills

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